How to Get Married in Vermont

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So, you've planned a lovely wedding, stayed within your budget, and and now you're ready for the actual getting married part of the process. But how? Don't worry, Tulle Nation, I've got you taken care of. Each week this year, I'll be sharing all the information you need to know to get married in one state in the United States. Today, Vermont!

So, you've planned a lovely wedding, stayed within your budget, and and now you're ready for the actual getting married part of the process. But how? Don't worry, Tulle Nation, I've got you taken care of. Each week this year, I'll be sharing all the information you need to know to get married in one state in the United States. Today, Vermont!

How to Get Married in Vermont

Application, ID, and Residency Requirement: Two people who are each at least 18 years old can obtain a civil marriage in Vermont. There is no waiting period or required blood tests. Anyone under guardianship cannot marry without the guardian’s written consent. Vermont also does not allow marriages between close relatives. You cannot marry a parent, grandparent, sister, brother, child, grandchild, niece, nephew, aunt, or uncle. You cannot marry if either of you is currently married to someone else, or if either of you is joined in a civil union to someone else. The law requires that both parties be of sound mind.

You can download a copy of the marriage license application and have it ready for the town clerk before you arrive at their office. Besides basic information about yourselves (name, towns of residence, places, and dates of birth), you must also provide your parent’s names, including your mother’s birth (maiden) names, and their places of birth. (Although not necessary, copies of your birth certificate can supply most of this information). Vermont law requires that at least one of you must be present to sign the license in front of a town clerk. You must bring a State or Federal ID with you to obtain the license (this includes a driver’s license, non-driver’s license, passport, etc.). You will also be asked to provide the number of previous marriages and civil unions, and how and when they ended. This information is confidential and does not become part of the marriage certificate.

Under 18: By Vermont law, no one under the age of 16 may marry in Vermont. If you are at least 16, but under 18, you will need the consent of a parent or guardian. Your parent or guardian should go with you to the town clerk’s office to sign an affidavit giving you permission to marry. (The affidavit is on the back of the marriage license and is a legal part of the license.)

How Much a Marriage License Cost?: In Vermont, a marriage license costs $45.00. Cash or checks ONLY.

Officiants: Your marriage can be performed by: a Supreme Court justice, a superior court judge, a district judge, justice of the peace, or an ordained or licensed member of the clergy residing in Vermont. If the officiate does not reside in Vermont, or is not recognized by the State of Vermont, they must file for a permit from a Probate Court in the county where the marriage will take place. In addition, any person over the age of 18 may register with the Secretary of State to become a temporary officiant to a marriage. For information to be a temporary officiant, please visit the Secretary of States website at www.sec.state.vt.us or call (802) 828-2148.

Valid: In Vermont, a license is valid for 60 from the date it is issued.

Equality Rights: Same sex marriage is legal in Vermont.

Name Change: Getting a marriage license with your new name on it does not mean your name has automatically changed.

It is very important that you verify all information with your local marriage license office or county clerk before making any wedding or travel plans.

Please Note: State and county marriage license requirements often change. The above information is for guidance only and should not be regarded as legal advice.

How many of you are getting married in Vermont?